Bill Nye for POTUS? Star Talk Radio for more 

spaceexp:

The Rosetta Mission Asks: What Can We Learn from Comets?

utcjonesobservatory:

You Can Now Access All Of Richard Feynmans Physics Lectures For Free: 
 
The lectures of Nobel Prize winning physicist Richard Feynman were legendary. Footage of these lectures does exist, but they are most famously preserved in The Feynman Lectures. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now you can access it online, in its entirety, for free.
The complete online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics has been made available in HTML 5 through a collaboration between Caltech (where Feyman first delivered these talks, in the early 1960s) and The Feynman Lectures Website. The online edition is “high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman’s legendary lectures,” and, thanks to the implementation of scalable vector graphics, “has been designed for ease of reading on devices of any size or shape; text, figures and equations can all be zoomed without degradation.”
Volume I deals mainly with mechanics, radiation and heat; Volume II with electromagnetism and matter; and Volume III with quantum mechanics.
Go. Have fun. 
[The Feynman Lectures on Physics via Open Culture]

utcjonesobservatory:

You Can Now Access All Of Richard Feynmans Physics Lectures For Free:

 

The lectures of Nobel Prize winning physicist Richard Feynman were legendary. Footage of these lectures does exist, but they are most famously preserved in The Feynman Lectures. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now you can access it online, in its entirety, for free.

The complete online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics has been made available in HTML 5 through a collaboration between Caltech (where Feyman first delivered these talks, in the early 1960s) and The Feynman Lectures Website. The online edition is “high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman’s legendary lectures,” and, thanks to the implementation of scalable vector graphics, “has been designed for ease of reading on devices of any size or shape; text, figures and equations can all be zoomed without degradation.”

Volume I deals mainly with mechanics, radiation and heat; Volume II with electromagnetism and matter; and Volume III with quantum mechanics.

Go. Have fun.

[The Feynman Lectures on Physics via Open Culture]

wepinkprimitives:

Saturntable by Nicebleed

Oh that’s my jam!

wepinkprimitives:

Saturntable by Nicebleed

Oh that’s my jam!

(via freshphotons)

"If I could find socks with bio-hazard flowers on them I would get them quickly."
gjmueller:

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

Scientists report that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other screen did substantially better at reading emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who, as usual, spent hours each day looking at their smartphones and other screens.

image via flickr:CC | danielito311

gjmueller:

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

Scientists report that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other screen did substantially better at reading emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who, as usual, spent hours each day looking at their smartphones and other screens.

image via flickr:CC | danielito311

sagansense:

thecleanhippie:

Needed this.

image

Recommended inspiration: Lawrence Krauss, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Carl Sagan explain our origins…

The universe makes me happy.

(Source: madeleineishere)

digg:

This is what it looks like to actually “burn rubber”

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Klari Reis

From A Catalog of 365 Petri Dishes

Beautiful (and a bit gross)

(via thomortiz)

GoPro Hero 3 inside the test chamber of Copenhagen Suborbitals. It’s intense. via dailydot Here

nevver:

Butterflies of North America
thebeakerblog:

"Mathematically, even though we’ve made thousands of them, they’re impossible to make." - Erik Demaine describing the hyperbolic paraboloid on WNPR’s The Colin McEnroe Show. (Image Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Stewart)

thebeakerblog:

"Mathematically, even though we’ve made thousands of them, they’re impossible to make." - Erik Demaine describing the hyperbolic paraboloid on WNPR’s The Colin McEnroe Show. (Image Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Stewart)

(via npr)